Bbc gel

BBC — Gel — eases inflammatory bowel problems

MIT Tech Review – Tiny Glue Guns to Patch Surgical Holes

Fortune – Bringing the Fire: A Q&A with Bioinspirationalist Jeff Karp

A gel that “sticks” to affected tissue and delivers medicine gradually over time could help treat some inflammatory bowel problems, researchers say.

Patients with ulcerative colitis often have to rely on medicine given by enema, but this can be uncomfortable, messy and inconvenient.

Now a US team has developed a hydrogel that attaches to ulcers and slowly releases a drug to help treat them.

The early findings are reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Ulcerative colitis is the most common form of inflammatory bowel disease and mainly affects young people.

It causes inflammation and ulceration of the inner lining of the rectum and colon.

  • bloody diarrhoea
  • severe abdominal cramps
  • loss of appetite
  • weight loss

Medicines taken orally they are often broken down before they reach the affected area.

Delivering the drug more directly through an enema – which has to be done regularly – can also be difficult and inconvenient for patients.

To overcome this problem, US researchers took a gel called ascorbyl plamitate, which is safe and already approved for use in humans.

In tests in mice and on bowel tissue from patients with the disease, the gel was shown to selectively attach to areas of inflammation.

The gel could also be loaded with a corticosteroid drug used to treat inflammation.

They designed the drugs to be held in place until the gel was broken down by enzymes present in inflamed tissue.

Experiments showed the drug was released at sites of inflammation and, in mice, could be given every other day rather than daily.

The team also used lower concentrations of the drug in the bloodstream compared with traditional enemas so reducing the exposure – and possible side-effects – in other areas of the body.

Study leader Dr Jeff Karp, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, said the next step was to test a different drug commonly used in the clinic and if that went well, to start trials in humans within a couple of years.

“We’re hopeful that this technology will allow patients to take an enema once a week rather than every day and without systemic side-effects or the need to retain the enema, as the gel quickly attaches to ulcers, ultimately improving their quality of life,” he said.

Dr Ayesha Akbar, a consultant gastroenterologist specialising in inflammatory bowel diseases and spokeswoman for the British Gastroenterology Society, said it was an interesting and exciting concept.

“The idea does make complete sense, especially for patients with ulcerative colitis,” she said.

Источник:
BBC — Gel — eases inflammatory bowel problems
The Laboratory for Advanced Biomaterials and Stem-Cell-Based Therapeutics
http://www.karplab.net/news/bbc-gel-eases-inflammatory-bowel-problems.html

Bbc gel

As a multi-disciplinary team united by a human-centred approach, we work together to design the BBC’s digital experiences.

Insights from BBC UX&D

UX&D stands for User* Experience and Design. It’s the umbrella for all the designers, writers, researchers, information architects and accessibility specialists that make up our 200-strong team.

Together with our colleagues in Design & Engineering, Editorial, and Marketing & Audiences, we design the BBC’s digital experiences. From Sport to CBeebies, Weather to World Service, you’ll encounter our work whenever you interact with the BBC online.

*Psst, time for a quick aside? Depending on who you talk to at the BBC, you might hear words like ‘audience’, ‘the public’, ‘users’ and so on. But really, it’s all the same. We’re talking about ‘you’ — the people who use our services. So, you might spot all of those words used in this article.

Though our team is made up of many disciplines, at our heart we’re united by a human-centered approach. That means everything we do starts with you. Our practice is built on getting to know you and crafting the kinds of digital experiences that suit your needs. From shaping screens to choosing the right words, it’s all about being useful, usable and user-friendly.

The BBC is full of creative folk, with so many great ideas. Design is a practical way to explore, experiment and evolve those ideas so that what comes out in the end is truly innovative. To us, design is the bridge between creativity and innovation. It’s how we shape new thinking into delivering better digital experiences. And in turn, it’s just one way we deliver on our public promise to add value.

If you’d like to know more about the principles that underpin our work in UX&D, check out this article from Colin Burns, our Chief Design Officer .

Our team is a kind of fabric that we weave together, with the warp and weft representing the different strands of our work. The warp is all the vertical strands, with teams of UX Designers embedded in specific online products like Weather, Sport or iPlayer. Between them our designers have a range of specialisms, from interaction design to animation. The weft is Design Research, UX Writing, UX Architecture and Accessibility. These specialist practices weave horizontally through all our products and projects.

Though our teammates work in smaller, independent groups (products) with their own priorities, together we make UX&D—one big umbrella team that everyone is part of. It can be a tricky balance, but the very strength of our team comes from all those interlocking threads, each supporting the other. It’s what pushes us all to do great work, share our practice and create seamless audience experiences.

There’s no such thing as a typical day in the life of a BBC UX&Der. But there are some common processes we share:

Diverge — the stages of a project where we need to think big and keep an open mind. These are exploratory phases, whether we’re gathering lots of research or coming up with loads of ideas.

Converge — here’s where we crack out the critical thinking. When we’re in converge mode, we might be identifying key challenges or honing in on the right ideas. It’s all about smart decision making.

Iterate — a fancy way of saying “now do it again”, the iterate stages are exactly that. This is where we test out ideas, change the things that don’t work and improve the things that do until we arrive at the best solution.

You’ll find different models for this kind of design process across the industry, from the Design Council’s double diamond

Источник:
Bbc gel
As a multi-disciplinary team united by a human-centred approach, we work together to design the BBC’s digital experiences. Insights from BBC UX&D UX&D stands for User* Experience and
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gel/articles/about-bbc-uxd

Bbc gel

This is a working demo of the GEL Typography Guidelines. This demo shows how our typographic styles are set across the BBC, online.

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics opening ceremony, heralding 11 days of competition for athletes with disabilities

Источник:
Bbc gel
This is a working demo of the GEL Typography Guidelines. This demo shows how our typographic styles are set across the BBC, online. Final preparations have begun for the London Paralympics
http://bbc.github.io/gel-typography/sample

Bbc gel

836 design principles and counting.

BBC’s design philosophy lays the groundwork for everything they do as a user experience and design team. It guides the way their service look and behave as well as the way they operate as a team. These are their principles.

«The Global Experience Language, (more commonly known as GEL), is the BBC’s shared design framework. A system of reusable interaction patterns used to assemble the BBC’s entire online output.
Providing a consistent user experience (UX) across multiple BBC services is vitally important. For our audiences, GEL provides ease of use, familiarity and the confidence to explore more of our online content. For our design teams, GEL increases our efficiency and productivity. And as a shared system, it supports collaboration.

Prior to GEL, our web services were all designed differently. This was confusing for users. It’s introduction in 2010 helped us rationalise the design of our online estate. We did this by consolidating our most common interaction patterns, (eg. menus and promos), and standardising our foundations, (eg. typography and iconography). But like any language, GEL is constantly evolving. We work tirelessly to improve its value and appeal, and we publish our work here on the GEL website.

An internet-fit BBC must support an increasing amount of content with a greater range of expression. Yet it must hang together as a coherent suite of trusted, easy-to-navigate services. GEL helps us achieve this, both creatively and effectively.»

Create a personalised experience for every individual — whatever their needs, schedule and interests.

Design to the needs of your audience. Every innovation has to benefit or delight them.

Consider every device and where, when and why it might be used — from the armchair to the Arctic.

The journey’s as important as the destination. And if your user veers off in a new, exciting direction along the way, all the better.

Upcycle existing designs. It’ll give you more time to innovate. And the greater consistency will encourage greater exploration of the BBC, online.

Create a personalised experience for every individual — whatever their needs, schedule and interests.

Design to the needs of your audience. Every innovation has to benefit or delight them.

Consider every device and where, when and why it might be used — from the armchair to the Arctic.

The journey’s as important as the destination. And if your user veers off in a new, exciting direction along the way, all the better.

Upcycle existing designs. It’ll give you more time to innovate. And the greater consistency will encourage greater exploration of the BBC, online.

Источник:
Bbc gel
836 design principles and counting. BBC’s design philosophy lays the groundwork for everything they do as a user experience and design team. It guides the way their service look and behave as
http://www.designprinciplesftw.com/collections/bbc-design-philosophy

Bbc gel

Page tables are a common tool used in content strategy, they can be used for a number of purposes. In this case, it was to help the designers separate the content from the visual design layer and focus on the different areas of the content structure and meaning, how the content is broken down.

This is the summary. Attached is is the original PDF (created from a word document)

  • Pattern title, e.g. Info Panel
  • Pattern long description 200 characters (Including spaces)
  • Pattern short description 50 characters (Including spaces)

List the relevant tags associated with each topic:

Platform, e.g. Mobile, Tablet Device e.g. Android Other keywords

Is there a demo of this pattern? If the pattern if visual it may not apply but with regards to interactive patterns this could be considered essential.

If and when examples of this pattern are live, in context, in situ, list these here.

Section to describe how this pattern is applied.

The concept of a user journey only applies to specific instances.

To list the multiple dos and don’ts with regards to this pattern.

This area is to consider the code applicable for this pattern.

How do we represent the markup of a pattern.

If this pattern is made up of other patterns, please list the pattern titles here.

This is an optional section so may remain blank, as it will not apply to all patterns.

In contrast to the section above (made up of …) state if this pattern may be included within other patterns. If that’s the case list the title of the patterns in which where they are used here. This is an optional section, as it will not apply to all patterns.

This is an optional section so may remain blank, as it will not apply to all patterns.

Источник:
Bbc gel
Page tables are a common tool used in content strategy, they can be used for a number of purposes. In this case, it was to help the designers separate the content from the visual design layer and
http://www.anoushkaferrari.com/bbc-gel-v2-page-tables/

Frontend NE

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Jack Franklin takes us through ‘Migrating from Angular to React: A tale from the trenches’.

Munchstars is a web app aimed at children to educate them in a fun, interactive and engaging way about health and how decisions they make could affect their wellbeing.

Opening Silos in Big Brilliant Corporations Part 1

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Opening Silos in Big Brilliant Corporations Part 2

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Security in the early days of the web was hard. One day your HTML is disintegrating, the next you are fighting someone named “

” who has found a way to take over your forum system.

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Источник:
Frontend NE
Frontend NE has been host to some amazing talks. Want to watch the videos from past events? Flick through the slides? Take your pick!
http://frontendne.co.uk/talks

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